The Golden Carrot

is a forever home for older and manageably disabled horses, fully supported by the kind and generous donations of the public. As these horses are difficult to place in knowledgeable and responsible homes, they can depend on a final retirement here.   However, as a service to the community, we will help people who are trying to  place their healthy horse in a new home by working with other rescues.  If you need such help, please send pictures of your horse and history of experience and physical abilities/disabilities including age, as well as your ability to transport or provide ongoing support in any amount, to cocarrot@earthlink.net  - we'll do our best to help you.

The Golden Carrot

THIS IS A FOREVER HOME FOR OLDER AND MANAGEABLY DISABLED HORSES. THEY ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR ADOPTION!

 

Join us today in our efforts to save those unloved, unwanted, unsafe equines, who deserve a better chance at life.

Donate if you can. Volunteer if you can. Spread the word!

"Reggie"

OTTB, Chestnut gelding foaled in 1982

Arrived TGC 1-16-15

Passed away 6-20-16

 

Reggie's owner posted on a FB page to find him a home, as she could no longer afford to care for him.  Sadly, so many people immediately suggested euthanizing him, simply because he's 33 years old.

Here's what she wrote about him:

The only part of his tattoo I am certain of is that it starts with the letter L, which means he was born in 1982 (33 years old). The tattoo is quite faded and it's difficult to get Reggie to keep his lip still, which doesn't make trying to read it any easier.

History
I found Reggie in July 2006 in less than desirable conditions. He was underweight, his hooves and teeth were in need of attention, and he was sitting in a pen all day as a companion to a young horse. He was not the kind of horse I had been looking for, but Reggie tugged on my heartstrings and I knew he had to come home with me. After a little TLC, Reggie became my riding horse. I took lessons on him and my friend Anna took him for long, leisurely trail rides. I retired him from riding in 2010 due to his age. Later that year, Reggie became a therapy horse with Special Spirit, Inc, a nonprofit organization that provides equine assisted therapies to special needs children. The job was perfect for him, as it was very light work (mainly walking with clients typically under 60 pounds), and he took to it like a duck to water. His calm, quiet, willing temperament made him a favorite among staff and students alike. Early in 2014, due to his advanced age, Reggie was officially retired. Reggie has helped improve and enrich the lives of so many people, and I'm so grateful that he can enjoy his twilight years at TGC.

Reggie is a very sweet, gentle, and affectionate horse. He is not suitable for any riding, but he's still quite lively; he regularly bucks & canters about in turnout and you should see how animated he gets at feeding time. He was used in therapeutic riding and Equine Assisted Psychotherapy for ~4 years; first picture below is an example of one of the many wacky EAP activities he didn't bat an eye at. Reggie loves people & kids and gets along well with other horses. Before he came into my life, he was kept as a companion to a couple yearlings/2 year olds. He has a small blind spot in his left eye from a corneal ulcer but it does not impact his functioning at all. As with many geriatric horses, Reggie has bad teeth and the majority of his diet is soaked pelleted feed (oat hay pellets, rice bran pellets, Equine Senior). He's been barefoot for 4+ years and has pretty solid feet aside from persistent small toe cracks. Farrier says they're caused by fungus within the hoof and is not really concerned about them – trims every 8 weeks keep his feet in good shape

 

 

 

She and I talked, she drove to TGC to look at the facility and horses and four days later, Reggie arrived!

I'm glad to say a couple months after his arrival Reggie has joined Jeeps and Queenie.   Here he is with his new friends...

 

 

 Reggie, at 33, is clearly a special needs guy!  Extra special feed; a look at his teeth by the vet, and his feet by the farrier, and thin as he is, arriving at TGC in the dead of winter, he needs our help. Can you offer a monthly amount to help this very deserving guy have some golden years?

 

I'm happy to say that DeeDe G. has stepped up as part sponsor for Reggie!  In addition Reggie is now also sponsored by Anne L!  And now, Sue Holland has joined his crew of sponsors! Thank you Ladies all! Can you join these ladies to help us help him?

 


Star and Ronan

Star and Ronan were the youngest horses at TGC - But now Gio and Jed are! All thrown away because people could not be bothered. Can you help them?
 
Jed and Gio - the youngest horses at TGC 

 

Duke

Many horses come to TGC ill, abused, starved. Right is Duke in July of 2008, and below is him again 2 months later.  We CAN make a difference, with your help.

Duke 2 months after he arrived at TGC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Golden Carrot is home to 37 horses and 2 donks at this time.

WISH LIST:

First and foremost:  The Golden Carrot was hoping for a donation of land but after a decade, it seemed clear that we weren't going to get that. I'd been saving every penny hoping to have travel expenses, but decided to use it as a downpayment. Then came up against the hard truth that no lenders will lend to a 501c3. No matter what. So in the end, after countless hours on all the real estate sites, I found, and purchased, 130 acres in Snowflake AZ.  It is raw land, and while I have enough to get the well drilled and operational, and the property fenced, we still need your help.  Stalls will cost a lot to build. Tractor work to level a site, materials, someone to build, trenching water lines and electric etc.  Any donation you can make to help with these costs will be so much appreciated.

 

Or - do you have pipe corral panels you can donate? When we get to that point, would you be willing to help us transport our equine residents to their new digs? 

Secondly, donations, big or small, one-time or monthly, including sponsorships. If donations could swell a little, I could afford to offer an actual salary to a helper, and should we get to that land, I will need a helper!

 

Or maybe someone knows a big company that wants to sponsor us with one big donation (we could use that for the land!!)

 

Top rated non profit 2012 

SHI - Support Stolen Horse International